Jesper Elving
Image of reskov, tunis, goffer, lok

reskov, tunis, goffer, lok

28.00

Jesper Elving
reskov, tunis, goffer, lok
4 x 16 A3 sheets
July 2018
View 3 pages from reskov

Jesper Elving (b. 1979) has been publishing poetry since 2006. He has worked with many different forms of publishing and performance and collaborated with dancers, visual artists, musicians and sound artists. Jesper Elving currently lives and works in Copenhagen.

Jakob Schweppenhäuser's introduction to the work of Jesper Elving from the conference The Experiments in Contemporary Poetry, Aalborg University 2015:

"Sound poetry has a long tradition. One can even argue that its tradition reaches all the way back to the very origins of poetry: to the first rhythmically uttered cry, chanting, singing... Later, in the shadows of the Great War, the Dada movement found a new relevance of sound poetry. Nevertheless, the sound poetry of Jesper Elving does not appear as a nostalgic journey back to neither the roots of poetry or to the Dada poets, not at all. On the contrary, it appears fresh and strangely original. Over the last decade, Elving has published a remarkable amount of books full of sound poetry: kakt nimhe, belko, gilke menjer, metoj, desser, nobu, nefnur, kolme, laggi, stennel, stenne, kibnev, femp, stolek and the latest two: voggi and lendon – just to name a few...

Danish critic Lars Bukdahl has often termed the poetry of Jesper Elving "nonsense" (with great veneration by the way). But is it true that these words do not make sense? Or do they rather exactly make sense: create sense? A hundred years ago, Russian avant-garde poets called their literary experiments заумь, Zaum: 'za' means 'beyond', 'um' means 'mind'. This Russian word can thus be translated into the word beyonsense – not nonsense…"